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Webinars

I run regular webinars, using the product GoToWebinar which is free for you to use (see Note below).  The webinar takes place over the internet and allows you to:

  • see what is on my screen;
  • hear what I am saying;
  • participate in a variety of ways, including by voice, by typing messages and by completing polls and surveys during and after the webinar.

Each webinar lasts about an hour, and there are three types:

  • An introductory overview which normally runs three times a year and is free of charge.
  • Webinars focused on the data protection issues that arise in particular areas of work.  These cost just £9.  The number of participants is generally between 10 and 20 - so it's not a lecture.  There are plenty of opportunities for you to ask questions (especially if you have a microphone connected to your computer).
  • Occasional workshops on specific policy areas, where participants discuss the issues and get the information they need to compile their own policy document.  After the webinar I am available to review the finished products for each participant individually.  It's the cheapest way to get my input into your policy development.

Booking a webinar is easy

To register for a webinar, select the one you are interested, click the 'Register' button and provide your name, organisation and email address.  If there is a fee you can pay online or make an electronic transfer.

Other topics are added to the list all the time.  Let me know if you are looking for a topic that is not listed.

Joining a webinar is easy

The process of participating in a webinar is quite straightforward, but for those who have not done it before, there are two documents you might want to download:

  • This introduction provides a quick guide to what equipment you need, and what you need to do before the webinar starts.
  • These notes will help you operate the webinar software.  It may be useful to print them off in order to have them handy on the day.

Note: GoToWebinar supports Windows machines and Macs, but unfortunately not Linux.